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Paediatric ENT

Paediatric ENT (Children’s ENT problems)

Around 8 in 10 children will experience glue ear before starting school, the medical name for this condition is otitis media with effusion. Glue ear can be resultant from an ear infection, however many children will experience it not having had any signs of infection. Sometimes, the adenoid at the back of the nose can become infected from a common cough or cold and the bacteria can spread to the ear which causes inflammation and fluid (glue) may form as a result. Hearing loss from glue ear often goes unnoticed by parents but in younger children, it may be evident from delayed speech and language development. Earache is not always a complaint of glue ear, some children may have problems with balance and/or poor attention. Behavioural problems are sometimes noted which are in fact resultant from glue ear; most likely as a result of frustration because the child is struggling to hear.
Conductive hearing loss is the most common type of hearing loss in children and is generally as a result of problems arising from the ear canal, ear drum (tympanic membrane) or the ossicles (bones of the middle ear; the Hammer, Anvil and Stirrup or, Malleus, Incus and Stapes). Fluid trapped behind the ear drum is the most common cause of conductive hearing loss in children, this is the condition known as glue ear, or Otitis Media with Effusion. The hearing loss is resultant from the fluid preventing the ear drum from vibrating.
Some children are born with poorly formed bones of the middle ear, sometimes they are damaged through infection but both result in conductive hearing loss in the child.
Sensorineural hearing loss can affect children and is sometimes as a result of an inherited disorder, it can vary from a mild hearing loss to severe deafness.

Paediatric audiology (children’s hearing problems)

Conductive hearing loss is the most common type of hearing loss in children and is generally as a result of problems arising from the ear canal, ear drum (tympanic membrane) or the ossicles (bones of the middle ear; the Hammer, Anvil and Stirrup or, Malleus, Incus and Stapes). Fluid trapped behind the ear drum is the most common cause of conductive hearing loss in children, this is the condition known as glue ear, or Otitis Media with Effusion. The hearing loss is resultant from the fluid preventing the ear drum from vibrating.
Some children are born with poorly formed bones of the middle ear, sometimes they are damaged through infection but both result in conductive hearing loss in the child.
Sensorineural hearing loss can affect children and is sometimes as a result of an inherited disorder, it can vary from a mild hearing loss to severe deafness.